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September 21st, 2013:

Boston Globe Bibliophiles: Bob Shacochis

The Boston Globe has a weekly column where a bibliophile is interviewed.  The article is edited down to include mostly details about what the person is reading.  If you have a hard time finding the next book to read it’s a great source.  Here’s my attempt to collect, and publish the information for the world at large.

Quick Bio: Bob Shacochis

The interviewee is an author of the following books.

“…about the fastest boat ride every down the Colorado River. It should be an instant classic.”

“Her writing is always gentle and transcendent, and, of course, it sits in darkness.”

“It’s great narrative fun.”

“…and liked it.”

Have you read any other daddy-daughter books?

“Kathryn Harrison’s The Kiss. Kathryn was my independent study student at the Iowa Writer’s Workshop.”

What books do you assign in your nonfiction seminar at Florida State University?

“I don’t assign any. Just give them a list. The five top books are…”

“…am looking forward to reading”

NOTE: All of these links have a kickback to me, so manually search if you want to avoid that.

Boston Globe Bibliophiles: Peter Sagal

The Boston Globe has a weekly column where a bibliophile is interviewed.  The article is edited down to include mostly details about what the person is reading.  If you have a hard time finding the next book to read it’s a great source.  Here’s my attempt to collect, and publish the information for the world at large.

Quick Bio: Peter Sagal

“I tried to read What I Talk About When I Talk About Running by Haruki Murakami, who I love, but couldn’t.”

“…there are a couple a good books.”

“I have friends writing books that I want to read, like…but, I really don’t have time for pleasure reading.”

“…two terrific books”

“…one of the funniest memoirs I ever read.”

“Two really good books.”

“Steve Martin’s Born Standing Up is one of the best books about making art ever written.”

“I’d love to be lost in some big novels.”

“I loved…”

“I’d love to get lost in some nonfiction, too, like…”

NOTE: All of these links have a kickback to me, so manually search if you want to avoid that.

Boston Globe Bibliophiles: Andre’ Gregory

The Boston Globe has a weekly column where a bibliophile is interviewed.  The article is edited down to include mostly details about what the person is reading.  If you have a hard time finding the next book to read it’s a great source.  Here’s my attempt to collect, and publish the information for the world at large.

Quick Bio: Andre’ Gregory

“This last week I was finishing a beautiful novel…”

“I’ve begun a tremendous biography about someone I thought wouldn’t interest me, Teddy Roosevelt”

“One of my favorite books of all time is the four-volume biography of Lyndon Johnson. I’ve read that twice. I’m just hoping he’s still with us for the fifth volume.”

“I’ve read twice.”

“I think she [Debbie Eisenberg] is our greatest short story writer.”

“An American writer I adore is Philip Roth.”

“It’s one of my very favorites.”

“I reread Brothers Karamazov again and found it rather boring. It’s not the book. It’s us. We change.”

“I’ve read Pema Chodron. She’s a Buddhist who’s written staggeringly helpful books, particularly for when you go through hard times.”

NOTE:All of these links have a kickback to me, so manually search if you want to avoid that.

Boston Globe Bibliophiles: Bill McKibben

The Boston Globe has a weekly column where a bibliophile is interviewed.  The article is edited down to include mostly details about what the person is reading.  If you have a hard time finding the next book to read it’s a great source.  Here’s my attempt to collect, and publish the information for the world at large.

Quick Bio: Bill McKibben is a journalist who has dedicated most of his life to fighting global warning.  He became an author on the topic starting in 2007.

"I just read a great novel."

"He’s only written a few books because they are so long…"

"By far my favorite book of last year was Katherine Boo’s."

"There’s a wonderful nonfiction account of Mumbai called."

"Early in my life, [I was drawn to] the America West. I spent a lot of time reading John Muir and Edward Abbey."

"I compulsively read Wendell Berry."

"When I was teaching myself how to organize, the most important document I read was Taylor Branch’s majest three-volume history of the civil rights movement."

There’s a children’s book that was of great help to me.

There are two books in recent times about the fossil-fuel industry that are really important.

NOTE: All of these links have a kickback to me, so manually search if you want to avoid that.

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